Dear friends and colleagues,

Please see and share information below. Let me know if you have any questions at mlong@keene.edu. If you are attending the conference, I look forward to seeing you (or meeting you).

All best spring wishes,

Mark

**

Individual Mentoring
(Tuesday-Saturday)

The ASLE Mentoring Program is sponsoring one-on-one professional mentoring meetings with experienced faculty and department chairs. The one-hour meetings offer mentees an opportunity to ask specific questions about the ASLE community, preparing for the job market, working conditions at small and large institutions, the relationship between scholarship and teaching, and non-academic work options. Beginning graduate students may discuss work in the field as they begin to imagine a professional horizon beyond graduate school. Graduate students nearing completion of their programs, or those seeking academic positions, may explore questions about preparing a job portfolio or imagining faculty work in differing college and university settings.

One-hour conferences take place throughout the week, mostly during concurrent sessions that do not conflict with community events, including plenary talks and dinners. Mentors and mentees can meet at the ASLE registration desk in the lobby of the Kansas Union.

If you would like to arrange a professional mentoring meeting, please contact the coordinator of the ASLE Mentoring Program, Mark C. Long, at mlong@keene.edu <mailto:mlong@keene.edu> , before May 25th.

Staying Alive: A Workshop for Graduate Students and Academic Professionals
(Friday May 31: a special double session: Session 6, 8:30-10:00 and Session 7 10:30-12:00)

This in conference workshop explores the opportunities and challenges of an academic career. Workshop facilitators and participants will offer practical advice and shared wisdom for living an emotionally, ethically, and spiritually healthy life in academia. The first half of the workshop will focus on the organizing fiction of academia—the model career that holds out the promise of a fulfilling life that begins with graduate school and proceeds through temporary and tenure-track jobs to the tenure review, promotion, and retirement. The second half of the workshop will focus on stages of the academic career. Participants will share practical strategies for imagining and building sustainable professional identities in particular programs, institutions and the profession.

If you are interested in participating in this workshop, please e-mail the workshop facilitators, Mark Long (mlong@keene.edu <mailto:mlong@keene.edu> ) or John Tallmadge (jtallmadge@cinci.rr.com <mailto:jtallmadge@cinci.rr.com> ). Graduate students and younger faculty, as well as colleagues at any stage in their careers, are invited to share ideas before the conference at http://www.onstayingalive.wordpress.com and consider ways to use the online forum to continue building a sustainable vision of academic life in the years to come.

 

 

by Kyndra Turner
(This post originally published at the ASLE Diversity Blog, http://www.aslediversity.org/2012/07/23/alaska-juneau-a-graduate-student-perspective/)

In June 2012, I attended my first ASLE conference, “Environment, Culture & Place in a Rapidly Changing North,” an Off-Year Regional Symposium at University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau, Alaska. From baleen whales and bald eagles to stimulating panels and keynote speakers—Julie Cruikshank, Ellen Frankenstein, Nancy Lord, and Ernestine Hayes—ASLE Alaska did an excellent job of expanding my understanding of Juneau and the human-nature concerns of our time.

As a doctorate student, I was delighted to see such a strong graduate student presence at the conference. I had the pleasure of presenting my paper along side fellow graduate students Sarah Grieve (Arizona State University) and Melissa Slocum (Pennsylvania State University). From indigenous memoir writers, modernist American poets, and English Romantic novelists to TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline and transnational crane migration routes, this panel focused on the diverse ways in which ecological relationships are voiced.

Sponsored by the ASLE Diversity Caucus, our panel, “From the Margins to the Center: The Transnational Implications of America’s North vs. South Narrative,” attempted to focus ecocritical attention on dislocation and displacement, topics that have traditionally occupied the margins of environmental discourses. Our chair, Dr. Salma Monani, and ASLE president, Dr. Joni Adamson, were extremely encouraging about our topics, as was the audience. In fact, the genuine and helpful responses from the audience at all of the panels I attended seemed to focus on elaborating key points, exchanging resources, and suggestions for future research. This type of enthusiastic collaboration felt truly productive as it helped me redefine and focus my current work while encouraging me to expand my future environmental research.

My only criticism (which seems more like a reoccurring theme of graduate school or perhaps even academia overall)—was, of course, not enough funding. There were only four $500 graduate travel grants awarded so not all the graduate students who attended received funding. But I would encourage any fellow graduate student to attend future ASLE conferences even if they don’t receive funding. The mentorship, feedback, professional network, and overall experience is truly invaluable. Last but not least, I would like to give a special thanks to Sarah Jaquette Ray, Kevin Maier, and the University of Alaska Southeast who hosted this year ASLE Off-year Regional Symposium and the welcoming Tlingit people. As learned to say at a session focusing on Tlingit culture, “Gunalchéesh.”

There are a number of new job and fellowship postings at the website for positions beginning next fall, with application deadlines this fall.  Please check them out if you are going on the job market this year!

http://www.asle.org/site/resources/jobs/

To subscribe yourself to the ASLE-grad listserv, please follow this link:
http://www.interversity.org/lists/asle-grad/subscribe.html

Thank you to those who showed up for Thursday evening’s Graduate Working Group at the ASLE Conference ! I’m in the process of figuring out the logistics of a listserv, as well as the other issues we discussed. Keep giving me feedback and suggestions!

I can be reached either at DrJillElizabeth@gmail.com or through the ASLE Graduate Student Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/pages/ASLE-Graduate-Students/205287739513823).

namaste,

Jill

If you are a graduate student interested in adding your name and email address to the ASLE Graduate Student Working Group, please send me (Jill) your name and email to DrJillElizabeth@gmail.com.  I will add your info to our growing list of graduate students available to help the GSLs by volunteering their opinions, thoughts, and sometimes their time.

Dear ASLE Graduate Students,

If you would like to sign up for a meeting please let me know as soon as possible. I may be able to schedule meetings through next week.

The one-hour meetings offer an opportunity to ask specific questions about the ASLE community, preparing for the job market, working conditions at small and large institutions, the relationship between scholarship and teaching, and non-academic work options. Beginning graduate students can benefit from hearing about work in the field as they begin to imagine a professional horizon beyond graduate school. Graduate students nearing completion of their programs, or those who are seeking academic positions, will find an opportunity to ask questions or talk about preparing a job portfolio.

One-hour conferences will take place throughout the week during concurrent session slots that do not conflict with community events, including plenary talks and dinners. The Mentoring Schedule will be posted near the registration desk. Mentors and mentees can meet there at the appointed time. Mentors and mentees can then find a spot to talk. There’s a faculty cafe in Ballantine Hall, an overly air-conditioned Starbuck’s in the IMU (the student union where the plenaries take place), and the outdoor campus spaces for those seeking a break from the conditioned air of the interior spaces on campus.

Please be in touch if you have any questions. mlong@keene.edu.

Mark Long
Professor and Chair
Department of English
Keene State College

Associate Editor, Pedagogy
Coordinator, ASLE Mentoring Program

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.